Alexander Histories and Iranian Reflections: Remnants of by Parivash Jamzadeh

By Parivash Jamzadeh

Alexander the Great's army crusade to overcome the Achaemenid empire integrated a propaganda crusade to persuade the Iranians his kingship used to be appropriate with their spiritual and cultural norms. This crusade proved such a success that the overt exhibit of Alexander's Iranian and Zoroastrian personal tastes alienated a few of his Greek and Macedonian allies. Parivash Jamzadeh exhibits how this unique propaganda fabric displayed a number of layers of Iranian impacts. also she demonstrates that the studied resources don't regularly supply a correct account of the modern Iranian customs, and sometimes incorporated historic inaccuracies. probably the most attention-grabbing unearths during this research is the confusion of old resources that arose among the rivals Darius III and Alexander. Jamzadeh argues that the Iranian propaganda relating to Alexander the nice has contributed to this confusion.

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VI. 11. , IV. VI. 11. , V. I. 7–8; cf. Plutarch, Artaxerxes XXVI. 4–5 for another version related about Cyrus the Younger and a Phocaean woman. Chapter two Darius’ Letters to Alexander and the Responses: Ideology of Conquest in Retrospect A subject that is closely related to the topic of the capture of the royal women, as reported by the histories, is that of Darius’ letters to Alexander asking for their release in exchange for concessions. These letters and the diplomatic approaches find justification as the aftermaths and results of their captivity, while at the same time some parts of their contents point to the probability of the letters’ inauthenticity.

9–10, while further on in III. XIX. 2, he states that Darius from Media (after Alexander’s sacking of Persepolis) sent the women and all the belongings with him in closed wagons to the Caspian gates. Darius himself was preparing for another battle. ; cf. B. Bosworth, Conquest and Empire, the Reign of Alexander the Great, Cambridge, 1988a, pp. 63, 94; Shāhnāma has them captured after the third battle, see ed. J. Mohl, p. 1397. the plight of the achaemenid royal women 21 her stood a large number of noble ladies with torn hair and garments rent, forgetful of their former dignity.

I. 45–51. , VI. IV. 2–8. , VI. IV. 9–10. , V. IV. 10–11. 175 Cf. Roger Sherman Loomis, Arthurian Tradition and Chrētien de Troyes, New York, 1949, pp. 255 f. 176 P. R. Cama Oriental Institute 64, 2001. 177 See above. 178 Xenophon, Cyropaedia V. I. 4–5; cf. Briant, 2003, p. 414. , IV. VI. 11. , IV. VI. 11. , V. I. 7–8; cf. Plutarch, Artaxerxes XXVI. 4–5 for another version related about Cyrus the Younger and a Phocaean woman. Chapter two Darius’ Letters to Alexander and the Responses: Ideology of Conquest in Retrospect A subject that is closely related to the topic of the capture of the royal women, as reported by the histories, is that of Darius’ letters to Alexander asking for their release in exchange for concessions.

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